Oct 31

SE: Wolf attacked dog – was shot dead

Wolf attacked dog – was shot dead

Roughly translated by TWIN Observer

Karlstad / TT

A wolf was shot dead in the area of Värmland Stöllet last Thursday after attacking a hunting dog, the newspaper Svensk jakt wrote online.

The animal was shot by a moose hunter who was sitting on the pass and the dog should have escaped a close shave.

The hunt leader reported the matter to the police, who now must find out whether the shooter followed the hunting regulations for domestic animals which can be defended against predators like wolves.


Varg angrep hund – sköts ihjäl

Karlstad/TT

En varg sköts ihjäl i trakterna av värmländska Stöllet i torsdags efter att ha attackerat en jakthund, skriver tidningen Svensk jakt på nätet.

Djuret sköts av en älgjägare som satt på pass och hunden ska ha klarat sig med blotta förskräckelsen.

Jaktledaren anmälde saken till polisen som nu ska reda ut om skytten följt jaktförordningens föreskrifter om hur tamdjur får försvaras mot rovdjur som vargar.

Source

Posted in Uncategorized
Oct 31

MI: Wolf attacks on U.P. farms a growing concern

Wolf attacks on U.P. farms a growing concern

Victor Skinner | The Grand Rapids Press

MARQUETTE — Michigan’s gray wolves have attacked Upper Peninsula farms more times this year than the past three combined, killing a record number of livestock as state officials continue to push to remove federal protections for the endangered animal.

Farmers are reimbursed by the state for livestock killed in confirmed attacks, but the process can be frustrating because federal law leaves landowners and wildlife officials hamstrung in dealing with repeated attacks from rogue wolf packs, officials say.

Two dogs, 57 cattle, seven sheep and a guinea hen have fallen victim to wolves this year.

State officials say it is a small percentage of Michigan’s 557 gray wolves that prey on domestic animals from farms across the Upper Peninsula.

Last year, 16 animals were killed, said Brian Roell, a Department of Natural Resources and Environment biologist. There have been no confirmed kills in the Lower Peninsula.

“This year is the worst on record in recent times,” Roell said. “We have done some correlation and analysis, and for every increase in 100 wolves, that will equate to about another three depredations.”

“This is a relatively small number of wolves that are causing problems, six to 10 packs on any given year. But without the ability to control these animals, you can see what can happen.”

A state indemnification program requires DNRE officials to confirm whether an animal was killed by a bear, coyote, wolf or cougar and forward their findings to the state Department of Agriculture. The DOA then pays farmers for the on-the-ground value of livestock killed by coyote, wolves and cougars. It doesn’t reimburse for hunting dogs or pets.

Roell said wolves often target the same farm several times a year, and the most effective way to stop attacks is to kill the dominant member of pack.

Wolves, however, are protected under the Endangered Species Act and are illegal to kill except in defense of human life.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials are considering for a third time removing the animals from the endangered species list after a previous decision to do so was overturned in court because the USFWS did not solicit public input in the process.

Federal authorities started the year-long review process again this summer, and the DNRE could have special depredation authority by year’s end, DNRE wildlife chief Russ Mason said.

With breeding populations of wolves recently documented below the bridge, Mason said the authority to kill rogue wolves couldn’t come soon enough.

“There is no question about it, wolves in the northern Lower (Peninsula) will get into more trouble because the opportunity is more available than in the U.P.,” Mason said. “I’m pretty confident we’ll get our authority back.”

The state has paid out $54,241.15 to farmers in the U.P. for livestock lost to wolf attacks since the indemnification program began in 1996, and other agencies and individuals have donated another $10,050 over the years, Roell said.

MDA assistant Kevin Kirk works with farmers to determine the value of livestock killed based on DNRE reports, a farmer’s records and the current market price of the animal.

An adult goat or small calves, for example, often are reimbursed at $200 to $400, and a full-sized cow can be worth about $1,200, Kirk said.

“The price of an individual animal is based on market activity, so it is a revolving target that is moving up and down,” he said. “There is a cap of $4,000 per animal.”

The money, however, is little comfort for farmers dealing with repeated attacks from more brazen wolves, Kirk said.

“I’ve had farmers tell me they are afraid to walk in the barn in the morning. The farmers tell me the wolves are not afraid of them anymore. They’ll come up to their buildings and their house,” he said. “They are overly frustrated and they are discouraged because neither the MDA or the DNR have any control.”

Source

Posted in Uncategorized
Oct 29

Agency Reinstates Gray Wolf Protections

Agency Reinstates Gray Wolf Protections

By TRAVIS SANFORD

WASHINGTON (CN) – Gray wolves of the northern Rocky Mountains will once again enjoy the protections of the Endangered Species Act, under a U.S Fish and Wildlife Service regulation issued to comply with a federal court order reinstating the endangered status of the wolves.

In 2009, the agency delisted gray wolves in Washington, Oregon, Utah, the Idaho panhandle and northern Montana, contending that sufficient gains had been made in the breeding populations to warrant removal of federal protections. Protection was retained for the wolves in Wyoming.

Environmental groups successfully challenged the agency’s decision before U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy, arguing that a decision to list or delist a species must cover the entire range of distinct population segment and may not be segregated by state boundaries.

Source

Posted in Uncategorized
Oct 27

Volunteer Wolf Trackers Needed in Wisconsin

Volunteer Wolf Trackers Needed in Wisconsin

Volunteers needed to help monitor wolf population in the state with wolf tracking training sessions and ecology courses set.

MADISON, WI –(Ammoland.com)- People interested in volunteering to locate timber wolves and other forest carnivores in the coming year can learn how to track wolves during a series of upcoming training sessions.

Volunteer trackers are assigned survey blocks in forest portions of northern and central Wisconsin, and are asked to conduct three or more surveys in their assigned block each winter. Data volunteers gather can be compiled to help Department of Natural Resources biologists in evaluating wolf populations.

Wolf and Carnivore Tracker Training sessions are scheduled:

  • Nov. 6, Ashland, Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center, Highway 2 & G, west of Ashland
  • Dec. 4, Babcock, Sandhill Outdoor Skills Center, 1 mile north of Highway 173 along County Road X
  • Dec. 11-12, Tomahawk, Wildlife Tracking with Dr. James Halfpenny, Treehaven UW-SP Field Station on Pickerel Creek Road off County A.

    Training sessions at Ashland and Babcock will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applicants should register as soon as possible because space is limited. There is a small fee for the classes. Training run at Treehaven near Tomahawk will be held on Dec. 11-12 will be presented by world renowned tracker, Dr. James Halfpenny. Cost of the workshop has yet to be determined.

    People interested in the training should register at least two weeks before each session.

    Details about the volunteer tracking program and the wolf ecology and tracking training sessions are available on the Department of Natural Resources website.

    In late winter 2010 DNR biologists estimated there were between 690 and 733 wolves in the state, including 655 or more outside Indian reservations. About one-third of the state packs are monitored by radio-telemetry, the remaining packs are monitored by DNR and volunteer trackers.

    In 2010, 140 volunteer trackers surveyed 78, 200-square-mile survey blocks covering 7,055 miles of snow-covered roads and trails. Volunteers averaged 4.2 surveys per block, and detected more than 363 different wolves.

    The volunteer carnivore tracking program is critical for us to obtain accurate counts of the state wolf population,” said Adrian Wydeven, DNR mammal ecologist who coordinates the state wolf program. “These surveys will continue to be important for long-term management of wolves and other forest carnivores in Wisconsin.”

    Volunteers are helpful in other ways, Wydeven said. Last fall, several volunteers conducted hunter outreach in the field and made contacts with deer hunters across several northern counties. During the spring volunteers helped with wolf trapping, radio collaring, donations of radio collars, and howl surveys as well as staffing educational booths at sport shows and other events.

    Volunteers are also strongly encouraged to take a wolf ecology course if they have not done so already, and biologists recommend taking the ecology course before signing up for track training workshops.

    Wolf ecology courses will be offered next year on the following dates at the locations listed:

  • Jan. 22-23, Babcock – Sandhill Outdoor Skills Center, Babcock, $75 (includes 2 meals & dorm lodging). Contact Dick Thiel at Richard.Thiel@wisconsin.gov
  • Jan. 5-6, Tomahawk – Treehaven, cost $105-$140 (includes meals; opt. lodging), contact Treehaven at treehaven@uwsp.edu
  • Feb. 19-20, Babcock – Sandhill Outdoor Skills Center, cost $75 (includes 2 meals & dorm lodging), contact Dick Thiel at Richard.Thiel@wisconsin.gov
  • Feb. 26-27, Tomahawk – Treehaven, cost $105-$140 (includes meals; opt. lodging), contact Treehaven at treehaven@uwsp.edu

    FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Adrian Wydeven – (715) 762-1363

    Source

  • Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 24

    Pelican Lake wolves pack a video punch

    Pelican Lake wolves pack a video punch

    Hunters get film of 13 in Oneida County

    By Paul A. Smith of the Journal Sentinel

    Related Coverage

    YouTube video: Gray wolves in Town of Pelican

    Town of Pelican — Race Foster sat in his tree stand and watched in wonderment.

    A few hundred yards away and across a boggy bottom, a grassy forest opening was bursting with animal action.

    A group of large mammals had taken over. While most cavorted, raced and wrestled, at least two stood guard.

    As best he could count, there were a baker’s dozen. Of this there was no doubt: They were gray wolves.

    “It was a sight to behold,” said Foster, 53, of Hazelhurst. “We see the occasional wolf, but to see a pack of 13 was incredible.”

    Foster was bear hunting on land he owns about 6 miles southeast of Rhinelander in Oneida County. He was joined by his son, Tristan. The date was Oct. 11.

    Foster said he was transfixed by the spectacle of so many wolves in plain view. He watched the animals through binoculars for several minutes before Tristan pulled out a video camera and recorded the scene.

    “Luckily Tristan remembered the camera, or we would have had to try to explain it in words,” Foster said.

    The video is slightly more than 10 minutes and accompanied by wolf-themed soundtracks.

    The footage allows a rare view of wolf behavior in a wild, Wisconsin landscape. As the pups race and play, at least one adult stands sentinel at the edge of the pack. Foster presented a copy of the video to Ron Eckstein, Department of Natural Resources wildlife biologist in Rhinelander.

    According to Eckstein, the wolves are from the Pelican Lake pack. The video appears to show four adults and nine pups; at 13 individuals, it could be the largest pack in the state, Eckstein said.

    As of late winter, the pack was listed as having just three wolves.

    Wisconsin had a minimum of 690 to 733 wolves in late winter 2010, according to DNR estimates. The population has grown significantly over the last two decades; the animal is protected in Wisconsin under the federal Endangered Species Act.

    According to the DNR, the state has at least 181 wolf packs in 21 northern and 12 central Wisconsin counties. The average pack size before this breeding season ranged from 3.5 to 4.2 animals.

    Several Wisconsin packs were confirmed to have nine wolves in late winter. The DNR conducts its population estimates in winter, when animals are easier to track and observe.

    Foster, an avid deer hunter, has owned the Town of Pelican property for 20 years. He said he has observed the deer population decline in recent years but primarily attributes it to DNR deer management strategies that resulted in high harvests of antlerless deer.

    “I don’t blame the wolves,” Foster said. “I support responsible wolf management plans, but I think the woods are better with wolves in them than without them.”

    To help deer herds recover in parts of the state, the DNR is prohibiting antlerless deer harvest this season in several deer management units, including the Rhinelander area With the wolf protected by the ESA, the state is limited in the amount of control it can perform on depredating wolves.

    However six wolves out of a Jackson County pack of nine were killed by USDA-Wildlife Services personnel earlier this month after they had shown threats to human safety. The pack also killed or injured a number of dogs, including a beagle near a house and a German shorthair pointer that was bird hunting with its owner.

    The DNR has petitioned the federal government to allow state management of wolves in the Upper Midwest.

    Foster said after about 15 minutes the wolves drifted out of sight. His bear tag went unfilled that day.

    “But to witness that experience, we took home more than we could have imagined,” Foster said.

    Call for calm in wolf debate: As wolf populations increase in Wisconsin and elsewhere in North America, the debate over wolf management grows more heated.

    A recent decision by a federal judge to restore gray wolves in the lower 48 states to the Endangered Species List has intensified the frustration among state wildlife managers, most of whom would prefer to enact state-run management plans, and fueled additional anti-wolf sentiment among some.

    The leaders of several hunting and conservation organizations this week made a plea for order in the wolf debate.

    The statement helps shed light on hunters’ traditional roles as conservationists who have served as the foundation of the wildlife success stories in 21st century America.

    It reiterates the groups’ calls for return of the wolf to state management plans. And it admonishes those who espouse poaching or other illegal acts against wolves.

    The statement comes from the heads of the Boone and Crockett Club, the Mule Deer Foundation, the Pope and Young Club, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the Safari Club International and Safari Club International Foundation, the Wild Sheep Foundation and the Wildlife Management Institute.

    Here’s an excerpt:

    “Finally, as we seek hard commitments from government, we also need to draw a hard line for ourselves: we are sportsmen, not wolf-haters. Statements on the Internet about poaching wolves are an affront to the American conservation ethic. Illegal killing is wrong, self-defeating, and exactly opposite of how sportsmen created conservation and the privilege of ethical hunting in the first place. Hunters in America fought poachers and pushed for laws to regulate hunting. Later, sportsmen paid fees and taxes on our own licenses and equipment to fund wildlife restoration that brought wildlife back to abundance, including the game we hunt. Ours is a history of self-restraint and respect for wildlife.”

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 23

    MT: FWP commission to address West Fork wolf hunt request

    FWP commission to address West Fork wolf hunt request

    by Mark Holyoak – KPAX (Missoula)

    HELENA – A request to remove wolves from the Bitterroot Valley is among many items the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Commission will decide in November.

    Commissioners will make a final decision on FWP’s proposal to request a federal permit to remove wolves in the West Fork of the Bitterroot Valley under the 10(j) rule of the Endangered Species Act. It calls for the immediate removal of 12 wolves and additional wolf hunts for the next four years.

    The commission will also make final decisions on biennial fee rules for Montana State Parks and Smith River State Park, an appeal of an ice fishing contest permit denial on Georgetown Lake, 2011 supplemental fishing regulation changes, and 2010 bighorn sheep and mountain goat transplant projects.

    It will also decide whether to classify coho salmon, Barbary falcon, koi and gold fish as controlled species. Also on the agenda is the consideration of the proposed nonresident big game combination license rule.

    The FWP Commission will also meet with the Montana Board of Livestock to hear an informational presentation on wolf population management. The meeting is Nov. 18 at FWP headquarters in Helena.

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 23

    ID: Phone company glitch spoils debut of wolf hot line

    Phone company glitch spoils debut of wolf hot line

    By Laura Lundquist – Times-News writer

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has started installing a management network for wolves in Idaho, starting with a wolf hot line.

    But the process — prompted Oct. 18 when Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter made Idaho the only state to surrender its wolf-monitoring responsibility — ran into technical difficulties.

    People who tried to call the hot line Friday morning were greeted by the irritating three-tone signal that indicates a call cannot go through.

    It was equally irritating to those at Fish and Wildlife who learned that Qwest had set up an inoperative number.

    “We discovered it this morning and are not very happy with it,” said Barbara Maxfield, the agency’s acting assistant director for the Pacific region.

    A 24-hour toll-free line, 877-661-1908, was supposed to debut on Friday as “a clearinghouse call center to help the public report wolf mortality and find answers to other wolf management questions as the transition from state to federal management occurs,” according to a Fish and Wildlife press release.

    “It’s a technical problem with the phone company,” said FWS spokeswoman Meggan Laxalt Mackey, who will handle the hot line calls. “We’re getting through it and appreciate everyone’s patience.” Mackey added that officials hope to have it fixed over the weekend.

    This is just the first step as Fish and Wildlife takes over wolf monitoring. Mackey said the handoff can’t happen overnight because decisions must involve both U.S. Interior Department and Idaho Department of Fish and Game representatives. That means if Idaho is allowed to have the job back, that transition won’t happen quickly either.

    Mackey pointed out that many functions related to wolves will continue unchanged. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services Division, 866-487-3297, will continue to investigate depredation cases involving livestock or pets. Even though Otter refers to elk as “livestock,” elk and deer don’t fall under the USDA.

    “The thing we need to get up and running is the day-to-day management of monitoring,” Mackey said. “Getting people on the ground.”

    Monitoring includes investigating illegal wolf kills. After Otter told The Associated Press on Monday that federal laws allow hunters to shoot wolves they see pursuing elk or moose, some worried that hunters would kill more wolves while the Fish and Wildlife oversight wasn’t yet in place.

    Otter reversed himself on Tuesday. But the worry caused leading hunters’ groups, including the Boone and Crockett Club and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, to write an open letter calling for calm.

    “Finally, as we seek hard commitments from government, we also need to draw a hard line for ourselves: we are sportsmen, not wolf-haters. Statements on the Internet about poaching wolves are an affront to the American conservation ethic. Illegal killing is wrong, self-defeating, and exactly opposite of how sportsmen created conservation and the privilege of ethical hunting in the first place,” the letter states.

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 23

    Pelican Lake wolves pack a video punch

    Pelican Lake wolves pack a video punch

    Hunters get film of 13 in Oneida County

    By Paul A. Smith of the Journal Sentinel

    Town of Pelican — Race Foster sat in his tree stand and watched in wonderment.

    A few hundred yards away and across a boggy bottom, a grassy forest opening was bursting with animal action.

    A group of large mammals had taken over. While most cavorted, raced and wrestled, at least two stood guard.

    As best he could count, there were a baker’s dozen. Of this there was no doubt: They were gray wolves.

    “It was a sight to behold,” said Foster, 53, of Hazelhurst. “We see the occasional wolf, but to see a pack of 13 was incredible.”

    Foster was bear hunting on land he owns about 6 miles southeast of Rhinelander in Oneida County. He was joined by his son, Tristan. The date was Oct. 11.

    Foster said he was transfixed by the spectacle of so many wolves in plain view. He watched the animals through binoculars for several minutes before Tristan pulled out a video camera and recorded the scene.

    “Luckily Tristan remembered the camera, or we would have had to try to explain it in words,” Foster said.

    The video is slightly more than 10 minutes and accompanied by wolf-themed soundtracks.

    The footage allows a rare view of wolf behavior in a wild, Wisconsin landscape. As the pups race and play, at least one adult stands sentinel at the edge of the pack. Foster presented a copy of the video to Ron Eckstein, Department of Natural Resources wildlife biologist in Rhinelander.

    According to Eckstein, the wolves are from the Pelican Lake pack. The video appears to show four adults and nine pups; at 13 individuals, it could be the largest pack in the state, Eckstein said.

    As of late winter, the pack was listed as having just three wolves.

    Wisconsin had a minimum of 690 to 733 wolves in late winter 2010, according to DNR estimates. The population has grown significantly over the last two decades; the animal is protected in Wisconsin under the federal Endangered Species Act.

    According to the DNR, the state has at least 181 wolf packs in 21 northern and 12 central Wisconsin counties. The average pack size before this breeding season ranged from 3.5 to 4.2 animals.

    Several Wisconsin packs were confirmed to have nine wolves in late winter. The DNR conducts its population estimates in winter, when animals are easier to track and observe.

    Foster, an avid deer hunter, has owned the Town of Pelican property for 20 years. He said he has observed the deer population decline in recent years but primarily attributes it to DNR deer management strategies that resulted in high harvests of antlerless deer.

    “I don’t blame the wolves,” Foster said. “I support responsible wolf management plans, but I think the woods are better with wolves in them than without them.”

    To help deer herds recover in parts of the state, the DNR is prohibiting antlerless deer harvest this season in several deer management units, including the Rhinelander area With the wolf protected by the ESA, the state is limited in the amount of control it can perform on depredating wolves.

    However six wolves out of a Jackson County pack of nine were killed by USDA-Wildlife Services personnel earlier this month after they had shown threats to human safety. The pack also killed or injured a number of dogs, including a beagle near a house and a German shorthair pointer that was bird hunting with its owner.

    The DNR has petitioned the federal government to allow state management of wolves in the Upper Midwest.

    Foster said after about 15 minutes the wolves drifted out of sight. His bear tag went unfilled that day.

    “But to witness that experience, we took home more than we could have imagined,” Foster said.

    Call for calm in wolf debate: As wolf populations increase in Wisconsin and elsewhere in North America, the debate over wolf management grows more heated.

    A recent decision by a federal judge to restore gray wolves in the lower 48 states to the Endangered Species List has intensified the frustration among state wildlife managers, most of whom would prefer to enact state-run management plans, and fueled additional anti-wolf sentiment among some.

    The leaders of several hunting and conservation organizations this week made a plea for order in the wolf debate.

    The statement helps shed light on hunters’ traditional roles as conservationists who have served as the foundation of the wildlife success stories in 21st century America.

    It reiterates the groups’ calls for return of the wolf to state management plans. And it admonishes those who espouse poaching or other illegal acts against wolves.

    The statement comes from the heads of the Boone and Crockett Club, the Mule Deer Foundation, the Pope and Young Club, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the Safari Club International and Safari Club International Foundation, the Wild Sheep Foundation and the Wildlife Management Institute.

    Here’s an excerpt:

    “Finally, as we seek hard commitments from government, we also need to draw a hard line for ourselves: we are sportsmen, not wolf-haters. Statements on the Internet about poaching wolves are an affront to the American conservation ethic. Illegal killing is wrong, self-defeating, and exactly opposite of how sportsmen created conservation and the privilege of ethical hunting in the first place. Hunters in America fought poachers and pushed for laws to regulate hunting. Later, sportsmen paid fees and taxes on our own licenses and equipment to fund wildlife restoration that brought wildlife back to abundance, including the game we hunt. Ours is a history of self-restraint and respect for wildlife.”

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 22

    CA: Manitoba opening up year-round hunting on wolves, coyotes

    Manitoba opening up year-round hunting on wolves, coyotes

    By Larry Kusch, Postmedia News

    WINNIPEG — Manitoba will soon be giving hunters and trappers free rein to kill wolves and coyotes on Crown land in agricultural areas to stem rising livestock losses to predators.

    Jack Dubois, director of the province’s wildlife and ecosystem protection branch, said year-round hunting and trapping will be permitted on the lands with the purchase of a $5 trappers’ licence. The new measure will not apply to registered trapping areas in the province’s north.

    Dubois said Manitobans shouldn’t fret that wolves and coyotes are going to be wiped out.

    “These measures aren’t going to necessarily decimate the populations. The secret is to control them to a level where they’re more socially tolerated, where they’re causing less damage to livestock and less concern to people for their safety,” he said in an interview.

    Rising wolf and coyote numbers are preying increasingly on farm animals and taking a bite out of farmers’ profits.

    According to the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corp. (MASC), a provincial farm insurer and lender, farmers lost 1,326 animals to predators — mainly wolves and coyotes — in the six months between April 1 and Sept. 30 compared with 1,661 the entire previous year.

    The federal and provincial governments, through MASC, paid out $328,683 in claims to farmers in that six-month period, compared with $433,285 in the preceding 12 months.

    Don Winnicky, who has raises cattle in the Piney area, said he had not lost a single animal to predators in 25 years of ranching — until this year.

    In April he lost two month-old calves, about a week apart, to wolves. And in June, he said an 800-pound (360 kilogram) yearling steer fell prey to the predators.

    “I tell you one thing, come next spring, (my) rifle is going to be with me every day,” said Winnicky, who farms in the southeast corner of the province near the Minnesota border.

    Farmers are already allowed to kill predators on their property.

    Sheila Mowat, general manager of the Manitoba Cattle Producers Association, said the MASC payouts to farmers only tell part of the story.

    Animals preying on newborn calves sometimes leave so little of the animal behind that there is insufficient evidence to make a claim for compensation, she said. “Often times there’s nothing left but an ear-tag and a foot.”

    Some animals left in faraway pastures over the summer simply disappear, and cows often have to be sold at a loss because of injuries from predators. Farmers aren’t compensated for injured livestock — only those that are killed.

    “Those cows that used to have value now have no value because they’re limping and crippled, so they’ve got to be culled,” Mowat said.

    Ron Alexander, a retired outfitter, blames provincial inaction for what he claims are “out of control” coyote and wolf populations in Manitoba.

    He said that an over-abundance of wolves — not poaching and disease, as some have suggested — are the main reason for drastically lower moose numbers in some parts of the province. He’s calling for bounties to be placed on wolves and coyotes to get their numbers to more manageable levels.

    On Thursday, Alexander scoffed at the province’s plans to open up trapping and hunting on Crown lands in farming areas. “It’s a joke. It’s going to accomplish nothing,” he said, arguing that a province-wide solution is what’s needed.

    Dubois disputes the notion that wolf numbers are exploding. So, too, does Stu Jansson, a director of the Manitoba Trappers Association.

    But Jansson said the predators have definitely expanded their range into farming areas to the point that “something has to be done.”

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized
    Oct 22

    ID: Dog poisoning is suspected

    Dog poisoning is suspected

    By KEITH KINNAIRD News editor

    SANDPOINT — A Sandpoint woman is urging residents to keep an eye on their pets after her dog was apparently poisoned last week.

    Dawn Billman’s 3-year-old Pomeranian died in her lap on Tuesday and her veterinarian suspects it was poisoned.

    Billman said Faith began showing symptoms of illness last Friday and by Saturday she could hardly walk. Faith vacillated between appearing healthy and sick over the weekend.

    Faith was seen by a vet on Tuesday, treated for dehydration and given antibiotics.

    “We had her home maybe two hours and she started seizing,” said Billman.

    The dog was rushed back to the vet, but died before help could be reached.

    Billman, who lives across the street from Farmin Stidwell Elementary School, said Faith spent most of her time indoors and would be outside for only short stretches and often with her human companions.

    “I don’t see why my dog would be targeted,” said Billman.

    Billman said she opted against a necropsy, but her vet advised that Faith’s liver enzymes were 10 times the normal level.

    Police Chief Mark Lockwood said he’s still awaiting the report, but he’s not aware of other dogs being poisoned in the city.

    Two dogs were fatally poisoned by strychnine on South Euclid Avenue in 2009.

    Last July, one dog was killed and two others were sickened when they consumed homemade sausage that was placed on a hiking trail in the Lightning Creek drainage north of Clark Fork. Those familiar with that case suspect the carbaryl-laced sausage was placed on the trail in an attempt to kill carnivorous wildlife such as wolves.

    Source

    Posted in Uncategorized